Jordan: Sickness

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Welcome back! This may be an odd piece to be quite honest. I’ve thought a lot about how to write this next post and still haven’t completely figured it out. I wanted to address how to deal with not feeling your best while traveling. Getting your body acclimated to another country’s food can be very difficult and can put you in some very uncomfortable positions. Believe me, everyone has experienced this at some point or another when traveling abroad. I’ve definitely had my fair share of misfortunes with not feeling well while here in Jordan. But how are you to navigate feeling sick to your stomach while abroad?

Abdalli Mall

Welcome back! This may be an odd piece to be quite honest. I’ve thought a lot about how to write this next post and still haven’t completely figured it out. I wanted to address how to deal with not feeling your best while traveling. Getting your body acclimated to another country’s food can be very difficult and can put you in some very uncomfortable positions. Believe me, everyone has experienced this at some point or another when traveling abroad. I’ve definitely had my fair share of misfortunes with not feeling well while here in Jordan. But how are you to navigate feeling sick to your stomach while abroad?

Steps in Amman

Pharmacies in Jordan work a little differently than in the U.S. Here, there is no middle man. You can walk into a pharmacy; explain your problem and they will give you what they think you need. This can be very good or very bad. When I first arrived here, I had major issues getting acclimated to the food. And unfortunately, I somehow neglected to include any medications that could offset potential stomach problems in my packing. That was certainly an oopsie on my part. The pharmacy prescribed me three things: a stomach acid reducer, an antidepressant, and an antipsychotic. I guess one out of three was good enough odds to fix at least some of my issues.

Inside the King Abdullah I Mosque

Here are some tips that I’ve used to avoid feeling my absolute worst here:

1- Avoid restaurants that look overly sketchy and that may have poor hygiene. I have fallen victim to food poisoning from establishments like this even though they were highly recommended by locals.

2- Don’t eat street food in your first week. Wait a little longer for your stomach to assimilate.

3- If you can, find some local yogurt and definitely bring probiotics with you to help with digestion.

4- Bring as many stomach medications as possible to help aid you in times of food poisoning. You may not need them, but its much easier to pack them and not need them than to need them and have to track them down here. Things are not nearly as readily available here like they are in the U.S.

5- Don’t panic! This is quite possibly the worst thing you can do. It’s normal for things like this to happen. However, if the pain/ issues persist, you might want to consult the local hospital to see what they could possibly offer.

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